92 in the Shade movie

Year:  1975

Duration: 01:28:44

Directed by:  Thomas McGuane

Actors:  Peter Fonda, Warren Oates, Margot Kidder

Language:  English

Country:  USA UK

Also known as:  92 gradi all’ombra, 33º à Sombra, ’40’ la umbra

Description:  “A young drifter returns to his home in Key West, Florida and attempts to open a fishing charter business, provoking a dangerous feud with a rival fishing sea captain.”

here are a couple of imdb comments i liked :

“Brash, eager young turk Peter Fonda, the wayward scion of a wealthy family, comes back to his sleepy Key West, Florida home town and decides to become a river boat fishing guide, which ignites a bitter feud between Fonda and two fiercely independent, self-made working class fellow guides — cantankerous, ferocious near crazy Warren Oates and his laid-back, but fretful buddy Harry Dean Stanton — over some choice section of fish-infected water.

An authentically wiggy, amiable, frothy, if somewhat erratic character-based study of the classic rivalry between the bratty, lazy new generation and the crusty, hidebound old guard who automatically feel threatened by any hotshot young competition with an incisive grounding in the rigid parameters separating the hoity-toity, overconfident upper class from scruffy, fidgety blue collar folks, “92 in the Shade” makes for a disarmingly quirky seriocomic delight. Acclaimed novelist Tom McGuane’s presentation of the nutty, enrapturing, intriguingly off-beat narrative tends to be pretty clumsy and unsteady, but there’s a catchy, idiosyncratic, nicely relaxed rhythm to the eccentric proceedings which neatly ingratiates itself upon the viewer. Moreover, the sharply observed characters are an amusing, enjoyable, entertaining bunch of cranky, obstinate kooks, the dialogue is often riotous (“Take your hat off, will ya? Let your brains cool off — you’re thinking too hard!”), Michael C. Butler’s bright, eye-catching cinematography gives the movie an attractive sparkling look, Michael J. Lewis supplies a pleasingly bluesy’n’woozy score, and there are plenty of hilariously wacky moments featured throughout.

The terrific cast includes Margot Kidder as Fonda’s flaky, flighty school teacher girlfriend, Burgess Meredith as Fonda’s crotchety, foul-mouthed rich grandfather, Elizabeth Ashley as Stanton’s pregnant, terminally out to lunch wife (she has this annoying tendency to dress up as a cheerleader and do baton twirls in front of total strangers), William Hickey as Fonda’s sickly, gloomy failure of a dad, Sylvia Miles as Meredith’s loopy, sardonic secretary, Louise Lathom as Fonda’s bored mother, and, in an uncharacteristically goofy role, a surprisingly uproarious Joe Spinell as Ollie Slatt, an insufferably smug and seriously obtuse businessman who professes to be a devout sportsman, but knows positively nothing about fishing. Fonda, Stanton and especially Oates in particular give funny, engaging, top-drawer performances. Although a bit rough around the edges, “92 in the Shade” generally succeeds with its keen depiction of everyday oddballs who are constantly at loggerheads with each other and overall rates as a leisurely paced, wryly humorous one-of-a-kind charmer.”

(Author: Woodyanders ([email protected]) from The Last New Jersey Drive-In on the Left)

“Don’t miss this little treat of a film. If you liked The Hired Hand, this has the same laid back style that works great for a Southern story. But it’s not so much the story. It’s the ripe dialog and a cast of Great American Actors that make this one to catch. Warren Oates and Harry Dean Stanton make a great team of ornery fishing guides. Burgess Meredith has a great role and makes the best of it. Margot Kidder looks absolutely great here too. But Joe Spinell is worth the price of admission in a small role. The cinematography is experimental like The Hired Hand but is not as successful. Overall, this film is a gentle surprise and would be perfect for a warm evening. Recommended without hesitation.”

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 92 in the Shade (1975)

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